Environmental and Historical Issues in Emergency Management

Mason Mill Park, Atlanta, GA 05/2019 (Taken by Me)

So, I was taking a long walk, a long walk, meaning I did not know one Mason Mill Park pairs up with Medlock Park. Well lets just say I found that out the hard way.

Anyway, It did give me time to think about the environment and historical structures liked pictured above. I thought there are a lot of issues in Emergency Management (EM) and what the effects are on the environment.

In 1933 to 1939 Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the New Deal into law and it became a staple of work during the Depression for much of society and structures we know today. Without that Deal I do not think we would have some vital things we take for granted today, i.e. the Interstate Highway System including some Bridges, the start of the saving of Historical Structures and Sites, etc.

Take a look at this article from The Balance to learn more about the New Deal.

I want to provide a few resources that might of interest to people that deals with the cross of environment issues and emergency management. One thing you will notice on this blog is I provide a huge amount of resources. I love to collect websites, research articles, etc. Hope this information helps!

EPA’s Role in Emergency Response

Emergency Response via the CDC

Environmental Emergencies

Environmental Health Services (EHS)

Here is a few course by FEMA Independent Study. These are great and valuable courses for any Emergency Manager or growing Emergency Managers or for others that just want to learn and grow in Disaster Sciences.

Last I also want to provide a great list of Training institutions, Agencies, and Organizations that FEMA has. Please take full advantage of these resources to learn and grow in all aspects of Emergency Management.

https://www.fema.gov/training

Published by

Jason Schmerer

I have 5 plus years’ experience in continuous improvement and analytics and enjoy helping others, connecting dots, and working with various kinds of both qualitative and quantitative data.

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